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    NIGHTCLUB LESSONS THAT TEACH US MORE ABOUT OUR CUSTOMER BEHAVIOUR - Blog.

    The latest news, videos and workouts from the Escape Fitness Team.

    NIGHTCLUB LESSONS THAT TEACH US MORE ABOUT OUR CUSTOMER BEHAVIOUR

    Standing out above the competition is something that every gym strives for. Nightclubs can teach our industry exactly how to do this. Knowing your customer and creating the best experience that adds the most value for them is a staple of success in any business.

    It’s important to sometimes look outside of the fitness industry in order to get inspiration on how to improve your own service and offer something new and exciting.

    As part of the Escape Your Limits podcast, host and Escape co-founder, Matthew Januszek, spoke to Peter Marks, CEO of The Deltic Group and expert in leisure culture and nightlife. The parallels with fitness are almost endless…

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    PRYZM Nightlife

    How to keep the competitive edge.

    There are so many gyms, fitness clubs and studios around the world that have multiple niche interest offerings and classes under one roof. Peter explains how, in any club scene, it’s vital that big operators embrace their ability to draw in the masses instead of trying to lead trends with single-style services alone.

    “Wherever we can we have three-room venues,” explains Peter, speaking above the dancefloor of PRYZM nightclub in Birmingham, UK. “We mix the music up so that we have mainstream house and chart music in the main room, we have a retro room with the lit dancefloor, and then we have an R&B room.

    “That allows us to be niche with our music tastes. But we are not offering ‘cool’, underground offerings to our customers because those sorts of customers wouldn’t want to go to a big club. They want to go to the small, independent clubs and there aren’t enough of them to make a good crowd for us.

    PRYZM Clubbing

    “We sell atmosphere. If you go to a gym and there’s only 15 people you think ‘Fantastic! I can get on all this equipment and get round in an hour and I don’t have to wait for anything,’ but if you’ve got 15 people in a 1500-capacity club, you’re out the door!

    “We need to fill it and that means we need the widest spectrum of customer going, which means that we can’t be niche. We’re a broad church.”

    What caused the need for different tastes all under one roof?

    Accessibility in the modern age is an incredible thing for consumers, but provides a previously unheard of problem for suppliers and operators. No longer do club owners have the power when it comes to what their customers experience.

    Whether it’s music or fitness, people can leverage technology at the tap of a screen to get exactly what they want, exactly when they want it. This means that, as a business or an entrepreneur, you have to either concentrate on the niche markets and really tailor your offering, or give as much variety as you can to appeal to the masses.

    “If we can have three or four different offerings under one roof, that stands us out from the crowd…”

    “You don’t have just chart music these days. People can get any music they want at any time,” Peter says. “There’s a greater polarisation of music tastes. We’re consumer-driven. We’re always looking for what consumers want, and we think: ‘what can we do that’s different from a small club owned by an independent, or a bar?’ The answer is that if we can have three or four different offerings under one roof, that stands us out from the crowd and gives us an edge.”

    Perception is key with these divisions of interest. Peter explains how, even though you’ve got lots of facilities to experience, your customers will still stick to what they know. However, the appeal comes in the fact that they could try out new things if they ever want to.

    “People like that we’ve got three different rooms, but they’ll only ever go to one! If you like R&B, you’re not going to go in the cheesy disco room with a load of people dancing to ABBA music.”

    Know your customer behaviour and you’ll better your business. Whether you’re picking one genre and sticking to it for the specific market, or appealing to a much wider customer base, research and recognition will be the key to your success.

     

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